NEWS: ANC2B Seeks Applications for Combined Executive Director and Webmaster Position

For several years, ANC 2B has employed a part time Executive Director and a contract Web/IT consultant. This month, the ANC voted to combine those positions and to seek applications from the public to fill the new requirements. The ED is a part-time, salaried employee of the Commission, who serves as the logistical champion of the Commission, ensuring that all necessary tasks for the efficient operation of the Commission are complete.

The new position description, along with a list of preferred qualifications, and anticipated level of effort can be viewed HERE.

We anticipate the position will require 25-30 hours of work per month, with a monthly gross salary of approximately $650, though that is negotiable. We would like to fill the position in the next month. The start date could be as soon as mid-October.

To apply: please review the position description carefully. If you are committed to bettering Dupont Circle and the District, please submit a cover letter describing how your experience makes you a strong candidate for the position and a resume to Commissioners@dupontcircleanc.net by September 27, 2015. You may contact ANC Chairman Noah Smith at noah.smith@anc.dc.gov if you have recommendations or questions. We anticipate phone or in-person interviews to take place the the last week of September.

Please also pass this announcement along to other lists and groups who may know of interested and qualified candidates.

NEWS: ANC 2B seeking applicants for the Jeff Coudriet Memorial Public Policy Fellowship

The Coudriet Public Policy Fellow helps the Commission improve the overall quality of its decisions and recommendations by researching and reporting on relevant public policy matters — such as best practices in liquor licensing, zoning matters, and historic preservation, or legislation and public policy that affects the neighborhood.

The Coudriet Public Policy Fellow receives a stipend each semester.

The expected time commitment is 5-10 hours per week, or 20-25 hours per month.

The fellow will: Assist the Commission in making more informed public policy decisions. Learn and report on best practices in city government and regulation – including transportation, zoning, historic preservation, alcohol control, public space usage, and other areas. Provide input on new legislation, regulations, and other public policy initiatives in DC. …and more!

Interested applicants for this intern positions should contact Chairperson Will Stephens, Vice Chairperson Noah Smith, and the current Jeff Coudriet Memorial Fellow Daniel Warwick with a resume and statement of interest by July 15, 2014.

Our Public Policy Fellowship is named in honor of Jeff Coudriet, former legislative staff member for Ward 2 Council Member Jack Evans’ office.

My Resignation

Friends,

I write to you today to inform you that I will be resigning from my position as Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner of Single-Member District 2B02. I am relocating to Petworth, where I have recently purchased a home. While I am very excited to be a homeowner and to remain here in the District, I am also sad that I have to leave the community I have called home for over 10 years now.

As Commissioner, I have been fortunate enough to play a role in a number of important changes and developments across Dupont Circle. Before I resign, I want to take this opportunity to thank you, my community and supporters, and reflect upon some of the things that we have accomplished together.

I must give thanks to the dedicated public servants in District government for their tireless efforts to assist me and my fellow Commissioners as we work to make neighborhood services operate smoothly and to keep Dupont Circle a destination for locals and tourists alike. My Single-Member District has benefited the diligent efforts of folks like Matthew Marcou at the District Department of Transportation, as well as Ruth Werner, and Sherri Kimbel; two of the truly outstanding staff members of Councilmember Jack Evans.

I would also like to voice my appreciation to those at the Alcoholic Beverage Regulatory Administration (ABRA), with whom I have worked very closely in my capacity as ABRA Committee Chair with the Advisory Neighborhood Commission (ANC). I am grateful for the assistance of Fred Moosally, Martha Jenkins, Bill Hager, LaVerne Fletcher, and Sarah Fashbaugh for their continued assistance in helping the ANC on alcohol policy matters ranging from small questions about the particulars of a Settlement Agreement to briefings on moratoria.

My appreciation also extends to the outstanding community groups I have worked with throughout my term, including Historic Dupont Circle Main Streets, Golden Triangle Business Improvement District, and Dupont Festival. Each makes vital contributions to our neighborhood and its unique character.

I am extremely appreciative to have had the opportunity to work with a number of talented Commissioners during the past three and half years. During my first term, I was able to serve with the support of long-time community leaders such as Bob and Susan Meehan, Victor Wexler, and Phil Carney. The guidance of Ramon Estrada on ABRA matters has proven to be invaluable; Jack Jacobson’s dedicated work ethic and focus is something I have strived to emulate during my two terms; and, I owe my initial interest in running for this position to the mentorship of Mike Silverstein and Mike Feldstein.

To my current colleagues, I could not be more proud to work with you. I know that under the leadership of my friend Will Stephens this Commission has and will continue to set the standard for the rest of the District. I could not possibly be more optimistic about the range of talents and experience my newer colleagues Leo Dwyer, Stephanie Maltz, Kishan Putta, Abigail Nichols, and Noah Smith bring to Dupont Circle. I am excited to watch them excel and regret that I will not have the opportunity to continue to work with them on the vast array of projects we have undertaken.

Over the past three and a half years, we have worked together to improve our neighborhood and make it a better place to live. I am proud to have helped bring more bicycle parking and bikeshare stations to my neighborhood; established model standards for businesses and residents to follow with regard to both public space and Settlement Agreement negotiation; led the discussions allowing for increasing restaurant licenses both on P Street and 17th Street; helped establish new rules and guidelines to improve the governance of our ANC; and supported progressive zoning and historic preservation guidelines to support the future growth of the District.

Finally, I would like to show my appreciation to my 2B02 constituents that I have tried my best to serve over the course of my terms. To the folks at The August apartment building where I have lived these past 10 years: thank you for your continued support and encouragement. To the folks I have worked with on different projects ranging from liquor matters, to zoning, and transportation (Karyn Siobhan Robinson, Peg Shaw, Alan Rueckgauer, Jonathan Padget, Rudi Riet, and far too many more) thank you for your passion and commitment to making our neighborhood a better place.

At the conclusion of our May 14th meeting, I will formally tender my resignation. With my absence on the Commission, I will be nominating our outstanding public policy intern and ANC2B02 resident Daniel Warwick to serve as liaison to the ANC until my replacement is elected. I encourage you to reach out to him and introduce yourself; I know that he will serve our community well.

Thank you for your time and for allowing me to serve. Know that I will always remain an active advocate for the well-being of my community District-wide, and that I look forward to working alongside you to help make the District of Columbia a better place for all of its residents.

All the best,

Kevin O’Connor

BLOG: Proposed Revisions to ANC2B’s Bylaws

As discussed at ANC2B’s March 2014 meeting, I intend to propose the below revisions to ANC2B’s Bylaws at our April 2014 regular meeting – April 9. All deletions are indicated by strikethrough and all proposed additions are bold and italicized.

Please email your thoughts on the proposed revisions to us or leave them in the comments section.

-Kevin O’Connor

Commissioner, ANC2Bo2

Bylaws of Advisory Neighborhood Commission 2B

ARTICLE I — NAME:

Advisory Neighborhood Commission 2B shall be known as the Dupont Circle Advisory Neighborhood Commission, Advisory Neighborhood Commission 2B, or ANC 2B. The Commission is established pursuant to the D.C. Self-Government and Governmental Reorganization Act its successors, and the Comprehensive Advisory Neighborhood Commissions Reform Amendment Act.

ARTICLE II — PURPOSE:

Section 1 — The Commission may advise the Council, Mayor, and Executive Branch agencies, and independent agencies, boards, and commissions of the government of the District of Columbia with respect to all matters of District governmental policy or service delivery. Such matters include, but are not limited to, decisions regarding urban planning, transportation, public works, streetscape improvement, neighborhood services, business revitalization, parks and recreation, social services, education, health, public safety, taxation, and cleanliness and sanitation which affect the Commission area. More specifically, the Commission shall consider administrative applications and proposed policy changes regarding, but not limited to, zoning, public space, parking and transportation, historic preservation, property use and occupancy, alcoholic beverage control, public safety, and comprehensive planning. The views of the Commission shall be granted “great weight,” as defined by D.C. law, when adopted by a majority of the Commission in a public meeting.

Section 2 — The Commission may present its views to public and private entities including, but not limited to, District, regional, or federal government agencies.

Section 3 — The Commission may initiate its own proposals for neighborhood, District, regional, or federal government action.

Section 4 — The Commission shall receive, investigate, and consider constituent concerns and complaints. When appropriate, the Commission shall attempt to resolve the concern or complaint. The Commission may transmit such issues to the appropriate public or private entity for resolution.

Section 5 — Each year, the Commission shall file an annual report with the Council and the Mayor for the preceding fiscal year. Such report shall provide a summary of the Commission’s activities for the prior fiscal year and provide pertinent recommendations for the improvement of services, policy, or programs.

Section 6 — The Commission shall when appropriate, constitute the citizen advisory mechanism required by law or regulation.

Section 7 — The Commission shall carry out any other function as shall be provided by law or regulation.

ARTICLE III — MEMBERS:

Section 1 — The Commission shall be comprised of the Commissioners duly elected and certified by the Board of Elections and Ethics to Single Member Districts within the Commission’s boundaries. The boundaries of the Commission and Single Member Districts shall be developed after the decennial census in a process determined by the Council.

Section 2 — Commissioners shall normally serve for a term of two years beginning noon on the second day of January following the election. In the case of a vacancy, such vacancy will be filled for the balance of the term of office in accordance with law and the regulations of the Board of Elections and Ethics.

Section 3 — Each Commissioner shall have one vote in Commission matters. If a Commissioner may not be in attendance for a particular vote related to a specific matter, the Commissioner may assign her/his vote in the matter to another Commissioner. In such cases, the Commissioner shall assign the proxy by signed letter to the Secretary indicating the specific matter and required vote.

Section 4 — Commissioners shall take due diligence to avoid actual or perceived conflicts of interest on matters before the Commission. A Commissioner shall notify the Commission of any instance where she/he has a financial or personal interest in an action before the Commission. A Commissioner shall not participate in the deliberations of or vote on any motions related to a matter where she/he has a direct financial interest. If a Commissioner is involved in civic, business, political, or neighborhood organizations with business before the Commission, she/he shall notify the Commission of this and of her/his role in the matter. When appropriate, a Commissioner may be excused from participating in a matter to avoid an actual or perceived conflict of interest.

ARTICLE IV — OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES:

Section 1 — In January of each year, the Commission shall elect from among its members a Chairperson, Vice Chairperson, Secretary, Treasurer, and such other officers as may be determined by the Commission. Additional elections may be held at any regular meeting upon approval of a motion supported by a majority of Commissioners.

Section 2 — A quorum for the election of officers shall be a majority of the Commissioners.

Section 3 – In the event of a tie vote, the election of a Commission officer will be decided by a coin-flip.

Section 4  3 — The Chairperson shall serve as convener of the Commission and shall chair the meetings. During meetings, the Chairperson shall rule on motions and procedural issues; such rulings may be reconsidered consistent with the parliamentary authority. The Chairperson shall supervise employees and manage the business operations of the Commission.

Section 5  4 — The Vice Chairperson shall fulfill the obligations of the Chairperson in her/his absence. The Vice Chairperson shall provide such assistance to the Chairperson as is requested and shall perform such duties as may be delegated by the Chairperson.

Section 6 5 — The Secretary shall be responsible for the preparation of minutes of public meetings and for maintaining the official records of the Commission. Employees may be assigned by the Commission to assist with these tasks.

Section 7 6 — The Treasurer shall be responsible for the fiscal management of the Commission and for maintaining the financial records of the Commission. Financial management shall be conducted in accordance with applicable laws, regulations, and Commission’s guidelines.

Section 8 7 — In the case of a vacancy in any office, the Commission shall elect a new officer at its next public meeting.

Section 9 8 — The Commission may create standing and ad hoc committees, the members of which may include Commissioners, residents, and other members. The Chairperson of each committee shall be a duly elected Commissioner.

Section 10  — At the December meeting of the Commission, the Commission shall select a temporary “Election Chairperson” to manage the election of officers at the January meeting, as described in Section 1 of this Article.  The “Election Chairperson” shall be selected from among the Commissioners or Commissioners-elect who will be in office at the January meeting.

ARTICLE V — MEETINGS:

Section 1 — Residents from within the Commission’s boundaries and invited guests may present testimony during the Commission’s deliberations on matters. The view of residents shall be considered during the Commission’s deliberations.

Section 2 — No official actions may be taken by the Commission unless a quorum is present. A quorum is a simple majority of the Commissioners.

Section 3 — Official actions, except for the amendment of these Bylaws, shall be approved by a simple majority of those Commissioners present and voting. In the case of a tie vote, in accordance with  Robert’s Rules of Order. the Chairperson’s vote shall be the deciding vote.

Section 4 — The Commission shall meet no less than nine times annually and shall normally meet the second Wednesday of each month at 7:00 p.m. at a place to be determined and publicly posted.

Section 5 — The Commission may periodically host “town hall” or community meetings to address particular issues or concerns.

Section 6 — Special public meetings of the Commission may be called by the Chairperson to address issues that must be considered between regularly scheduled public meetings. Special public meetings may also be called at the written request of two Commissioners. The purpose of the special public meeting shall be stated in the request. Commissioners shall receive at least two days notice for duly called special public meetings. Reasonable public notice shall also be provided for special public meetings.

ARTICLE VI — FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT:

Section 1 — The Commission shall develop and adhere to financial management guidelines consistent with applicable laws and regulations.

Section 2 — The Commission shall consider and adopt a budget outlining revenues and expenditures planned for each fiscal year. The budget may include unbudgeted reserves. The budget shall be approved in final by a simple majority vote at a public meeting within a month from the date that the Commission is informed of its annual appropriation. The Commission may amend the budget by simple majority vote at any time during the fiscal year.

Section 3 — The Treasurer shall prepare financial reports outlining expenses and revenues for approval by the Commission in a public meeting on a quarterly basis. The report shall be prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Auditor of the District of Columbia.

Section 4 — The signature of two officers shall be required on all drafts, money orders, and expenditures of the Commission. An officer may not sign a draft, money order, or expenditure intended for the reimbursement of expenses which she/he incurred.

Section 5 — The Treasurer shall serve as the Commission’s contact with the Auditor of the District of Columbia or other District officials on financial matters. Should the Treasurer be the subject of an audit or other investigation, the Chairperson will assign another Commissioner to assume these duties until such audit or investigation is closed.

ARTICLE VII — PARLIAMENTARY AUTHORITY:

The most recently revised edition of Roberts’ Rules of Order shall govern the deliberations of the Commission except when the rules are inconsistent with these Bylaws and any special rules of order the Commission may adopt.

ARTICLE VIII — OTHER PROVISIONS:

Section 1 — All staff members employees of the Commission shall be hired by the Commission and shall serve at the pleasure of the Commission. The Commission shall establish position descriptions for its employees. The staff members employees of the Commission may be hired on a full-time or part-time basis and for an indefinite or for a definite term. Persons hired by the Commission shall meet the qualifications established by the position description.

Section 2 — Copies of these Bylaws shall be made available to the public.

Section 3 – The Commission shall conduct its business in accordance with the most recently approved version of the Dupont Circle Advisory Neighborhood Commission Policy and Procedures Manual.

ARTICLE IX — AMENDMENT OF THE BYLAWS:

At least two weeks notice, to each Commissioner and the public, shall be given prior to consideration of any modifications, deletions, or additions to these Bylaws. A two-thirds majority of the Commissioners is required for such amendments to be passed.

Adopted as revised — May 13, 2009

 

BLOG: Our comprehensive neighborhood parking survey

Parking-signs-15K2-e1322013918854Posted by Will Stephens, Chair & 2B08 Commissioner / Cross-posted at www.willstephensanc.com

In a dense, mixed-use, urban neighborhood such as Dupont Circle, parking is an issue that is guaranteed to generate controversy — because it touches upon so many competing policies, interests, and judgments about value and fairness: the use of public space, local business development, environmental sustainability, multi-modal transportation options, smart growth, aging-in-place, and employment, just to name a few.

As you can imagine, we as ANC Commissioners get a lot of requests from neighbors — from nearly every residential block within the ANC — for preferred residential parking.  We have also been asked from time to time to consider whether to participate in a visitor parking permit program.  (For the time being, the ANC has rejected joining such a program, at least in its current iteration.)  We have also investigated whether there are zones in the ANC that could be ripe for performance parking — where meter rates can rise during peak demand times, with the additional income dedicated to community amenities.

With regard to preferred residential parking in particular, we want to be responsive to the legitimate frustrations of residents and other stakeholders.  However, if we ask the District to put this kind of parking in every block, we would likely cause havoc to an already over-taxed parking system.  We might be simply moving problems around or even potentially exacerbating them.  Therefore, we need to be able to be strategic in whatever we propose.

In addition, we need to be able to have sufficient information to consider other tweaks and changes to existing parking in certain areas — such as additional metered areas, piloting performance parking, re-purposing unused bus stops, or adding rush hour restrictions next to bottleneck intersections.

To that end, the ANC is currently undertaking a survey of all parking in the neighborhood.  The idea is this:  We first need to understand what are the current parking rules — i.e., where are existing loading zones, bus stops, valet staging, metered spots, resident-only parking, or rush hour restrictions, and at what times do the various uses apply.  The Department of Transportation (DDOT) has quite a bit of this information.  However, DDOT does not have all of the information, DDOT does not have it all together in a unified place, and DDOT’s information is not entirely accurate, as we have already learned by spot-checking a few key areas.

At the direction of the ANC, our public policy intern Daniel Warwick (a current student at GW) has been working to put as much of the existing DDOT information together as possible in an understandable format.  He has also surveyed other jurisdictions, such as Seattle, to gather some best practices on how to present parking information for each street.  On a parallel track, we are going to do on-the-ground “walk-throughs” in our Single Member Districts  (SMDs) with DDOT representatives to double-check and supplement the information.  Through these efforts, we hope to generate a comprehensive neighborhood parking map.

Once we have that survey complete, we will know what exists now — the status quo ante.  At that point, the ANC will be able to competently request any changes, or to competently respond to requests for changes from stakeholders like residents and local businesses.  Without this information, we will be stabbing in the dark and perhaps creating more problems than we are solving.

We also plan to hold at least one community meeting in the near future on parking issues, inviting representatives from DDOT to join us for an open discussion.  We held such a meeting roughly two years ago, at the time we considered participating in the Visitor Parking Pass program.

In the meantime, if you have comments, questions, or ideas about parking matters, please contact your Commissioner and share them.  If you would be willing to assist us in gathering information through “walk-throughs” of the streets, please contact Will Stephens (will.stephens@dupontcircleanc.net) and Daniel Warwick (coudriet-intern@dupontcircleanc.net).  This is no small project, and we could use extra hands on deck.  Thank you!